Vertical: V16 – Agro Economy and food Security

Notice Board -

   Horizontals

V16H1 Precision agriculture

Smart Agriculture or otherwise known as precision Agriculture includes the maximization of yield with minimum resources, such as seed, water and fertilizer, etc. A number of sensing technologies are used in Precision Agriculture, where wide range of soil mapping, monitoring, fertilizer applications with treatments, pH corrections can be sensed in a single go with the maximisation of the crop yield. Technologies of Sensors produce tools to achieve the above-mentioned goals. The significant technological advances and development in recent years enormously facilitates the attainment of these objectives by removing many barriers for their implementation. Precision farming is based on data gathering, processing and analysis to help farmers and food growers for improving the productivity and reducing the waste. The data is gathered by in-field sensors, and telecommunication devices are used to transfer the data to the internet. Data analytics tools are then used to enhance yields and reduce the environmental impact of farming. Several sensors have been used in agriculture, for instance, sensors for (i) crop health status determination, (ii) crop phenotyping, (iii) detection of weeds , microorgasnisms and pest management, (iv) non-destructive soil sensing, (v) yield estimation and prediction, (vi) fruit quality determination, and (vii) in sensor networks. Further, to improve farm productivity, sustainable agricultural practices can be adopted through mechanization, while simultaneously combating the challenges such as changing climate, depletion of water resources, and the potential for increased erosion and loss of productivity due to the occurrence of extreme weather events. Mechanization is a multi-dimensional concept and over the period of time, it has evolved. It helps in enhancing the productivity along with the reduction of drudgery. Another area of modern agriculture technology is big data analytics. Hence, if farm data is combined with seaveral other sources such as satellite or drone imaging, corporate agronomical data, public data (data from government agencies), emerging data (consumer based data), field-level sensors, weather stations and various historic data obtained from a variety of growers and growing conditions can provide valuable insight to the farmers. Such information-rich farmers are thus empowered to make appropriate decisions to increase their yields and reduce economic losses due to uncertainties. Introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) is an emerging field focusing on the enhancement of Agricultural production and the rural development in India. Thus effective implementation of ICT with cloud computing technology in the agricultural sector can have positive impact on agricultural development and food security. Therefore, present summit will be a good platform to discuss the above aspects and technological options for bringing new dimenstion in country agro=-economy and food security.


V16H2 Sustainable and climate smart agriculture

Indian agriculture, contributing about 17% to National Gross Value Added, continues to be monsoon dependent. Despite spectacular increase in total food grain production at national scale, farmers in many parts continue to suffer losses due to climatic stresses such as droughts, floods, heavy rainfall events, dry spells, cold and heat waves and hailstorms. Climate change is projected to increase the minimum temperatures by 0.95-4.07oC in 2020 to 2099 period over baseline (1976-2005 period) in kharif; and by 1.09- 4.65oC in rabi, maximum temperatures by 0.74-3.53oC (2020 to 2099) during kharif and by 0.88- 4.01oC during rabi. Rise in temperatures are projected to be more in northern parts of India than in southern parts. Variability in minimum and maximum temperatures and increase in rainfall with increased variability are projected. Such increase in temperatures and frequency of climatic stress are projected to further constrain agricultural production, if adaptation measures are not taken. Therefore, it is important to develop climate smart agriculture with low-cost, easy to adopt and low-carbon technologies that can sustain the farm profits. Such approach becomes important sinceabout 52% of the farmer fields still remain rainfed and about 47% are small and marginal holdings. The climate smart approach includes technologies that conserve the resources such as water, nutrient, energy, and carbon. In addition, empowering the farmers with weather information and knowledge on crop management and markets form crucial components. The adaptation strategies include genetic, agronomic, and extension approaches. Several adaptation technologies also help in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. Deployment of multiple stress tolerant varieties, exploiting the potential of microbial interventions in improving the water and nutrient use efficiency on one hand and reducing the GHG emissions on other is crucial. The use of crop residues to improve soil health, organic farming and integrated nutrient management form crucial pillars in sustainable and climate smart agriculture so as to improve the crop yields, profits, build resistance to climate change and reduce the GHGs from agriculture are addressed for meeting the sustainable development goals. All the above aspects and technological options will be discussed in the proposed meeting.


V16H3 Food safety and nutritional security

Food and nutrition security are a global challenge, and a pre-requisite for a healthy and peaceful society. India ranks second in terms of total food production globally, next to China. So, a multi-sectarian approach to improving food and nutrition security is required to address the complex societal challenge to feed the country. This will help in minimizing national food and nutrition insecurity in a changing world. The challenge for food industry involves the development of new processing technologies which ultimately associate with economic advantage. Food processing sector is indispensable for the overall development of an economy as it provides a vital linkage and synergy between the agriculture and industry. It helps to diversify and commercialize farming, enhance income of farmers, create markets for export of plant and animal based foods as well as generate greater rural and urban employment opportunities. So, a holistic approach for reducing various contaminants like microbial, antibiotics, pesticide residue, other chemicals, and heavy metals are required to reduce the health risk to human population. Hence, a establishment of surveillance programmes for their monitoring will help in reducing possible outbreaks. Further, smart and biodegradable packaging in food industry is need of the hour to protect the product of chemical, mechanical and microbiological impact, and also allows the freshness of the food product and keeps all its nutritional value with minimal impact on environment. It is estimated that more than one-third of food is lost or wasted in postharvest operations. Therefore, modern interventions and improved storage structures can play a critical role in reducing postharvest losses and increasing farmers’ revenues.


V16H4 Development of climate resilient livestock germplasm and intervention of modern technology in veterinary therapeutics and Zoonoses control

The Indian livestock sector is largest in the world, with a total of 535.78 million populations (20th Livestock Census, DAHD). Livestock sectors is the backbone of most of the India in which a major part of their income comes from meat, dairy, poultry sector and more than 60 percent of the rural population depends on it for their livelihood. Hence, increased livestock productivity is a major stepping stone on the path out of poverty and food security in India, however livestock farmers and industries face tremendous challenges improving production. Further, climate change and limited water and land resources has become an important area of concern for India to ensure food and nutritional security for our growing population. The impacts of climate change are global, but countries like India are more vulnerable in view of the high population depending on agriculture and allied sectors like livestock and aquaculture. This extreme weather event such as drought, flood, and long heat waves has been adversely affecting livestock productivity thereby endangering the food security of the country. So, the Prime Minister’s National Action Plan on climate change has identified Agriculture as one of the eight national missions. Therefore, there is a need to conserve and up-grade indigenous livestock resources for different country’s climatic and agro-zones (coastal, plain, and mountain) to become climate-resilient in nature using improvised breeding, selection and modern reproductive technologies, like whole genome-enabled animal selection, precision animal breeding, cloning, IVF, functional genomics, etc. Further, new generation veterinary therapeutics, nanomedicine, immunobiological agents for animal disease management are need of the hour for better health of livestock. New therapeutics and adjuvants/immunomodulators can also further contribute to the Indian economy to a great extent by improving the human as well as animal health. Stem cell based regenerative therapy is another area which has emerged as a leading field of translational research and veterinary medicine for controlling various diseases. Another important area where India has not developed so far is application of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) in animal health and farm management. AI and MI based Apps and instruments can help farmers and veterinarians to develop climate based farm modeling, decide if their animal is heat detection, feeding, sickness and is an emergency. Hence, this Vaibhav-summit-2020 will invites all Indian diasporas and national experts for discussion to bring new dimension in country livestock research and take our economy and societal development at great high.


V16H5 Application of nanotechnology in sustainable agriculture and metabolic biology

Since the green revolution, agricultural practices are continuously getting modernized and systematized, which is constantly done through scientific inputs and considering increasing population. Since then rural India is getting equipped with modern as well as improvised traditional agricultural practices. Further, when land and other agriculture resources like water are in threat, nanotechnology is coming forward to address these problems and improves the food productivity along with economy. So, far Indian agriculture has not been so openly accepted this nanotechnology. As we are aware that nanotechnology is one of the fast moving to the front fields of research that holds promising potential to address many of the burning needs in all areas of the plant and animal based food and agriculture and allied sciences. So, numerous and diverse characteristics and combinations of nanotechnologies may be applied in various fields of food sciences and crops and animal health viz. nano-formulations of fertilizers, alternative antibiotics for food animals, nano- biotechnology, surveillance and control of pests and diseases, animal feed-additives, development of new-generation pesticides and antibiotics, preservation and packaging of food and food additives, removal of contaminants from soil and water, improving the shelf-life of vegetables, meat, and flowers, etc. Nano/microencapsulation technology can be a practical and efficient approach to solve problems such as the physical instability and bioactivity of important active molecules and sometimes to control the release of active molecules to the external medium around the nanocapsules by diffusion processes. The future challenges lies with the production of novel artificial enzymes at nano-scale. Nano-enzymes have a large range of applications, diagnostic medicine, targeted therapy and biosensing. The use of nanotechnology in nutraceuticals is a rapidly growing avenue of science and technology, purposely gaining attention due to its active ingredient stability, bioavailability and stability, where the characteristic properties are conferred by small size and high surface- to volume ratio. To significantly increase the biological efficacy of nutraceuticals, nano-emulsions and polymer micelles‐based delivery systems have proven to show pathbreaking results at minimum costs. This system should be designed and researched to overcome the hurdles and thereby improving nutraceutical functionality. Thus, agricultural research becomes a lucrative interdisciplinary research where in one hand the agricultural scientists and engineers will be involved in understanding the plant system, whereas the electric, electronics, metallurgy, computer science, chemical engineering departments will be helping to bring the food technology and improving agriculture productivity, hence contributing to safe and quality food. Therefore, India needs to explore this new area of research and technology for improving country food productivity and food safety. Hence, based on above facts, this session will be conducted during the upcoming Vaibhav-Summit 2020 webinars among Indian and foreign experts.


V16H6 Modern fisheries, aquaculture and seed production

Fisheries and aquaculture sector provides livelihood to 25 million fishers at primary level and twice of that along the value chain in India. This is an important sector in India, providing employment to millions of people and contributes to the food security of the country. Presently, India ranks second in aquaculture and third in fisheries production, contributing 1.07% to the national GDP and 5.30% to the agriculture GDP. Aquaculture is a rapidly growing fisheries sector in India with an annual growth rate of over 7%. Freshwater aquaculture contributes over 95% of the total annual aquaculture production of 5.77 million t. Technologies of induced carp breeding and polyculture of carps in ponds and tanks brought about perceptible upward shift in freshwater aquaculture production. In recent days, the sector has been witnessing system as well as species diversification with the inclusion of tilapia, medium and minor carps, catfishes and murrels etc. Public and private carp hatcheries produce around 40 billion fry. It is estimated that an additional production of around 7.7 MMT from Aquaculture can be achieved at the end of 2025 which will make the Indian Aquaculture production to 22 MMT from 13.7 MMT in 2020. It would be more than double of the present level of productions of aquaculture and almost double of total fish production for India. By assuming 6 t/ha as the potential production of aquaculture ponds, the yield gap across the regions is wide, it is as high as 4.8 t/ha for north-eastern region and minimum of 2.7 t/ha in eastern region of India. However, in most of the other regions, the production can be increased many-fold by adoption of scientific aquaculture management practices.

Though the sector is growing, it is also facing new challenges from environmental stress and uncertainty. In this scenario, a global handshake with all the stake holders in science and technology is needed in the areas viz. water use efficiency (Re-circulatory aquaculture and Bio-floc technology), genomic selection and improved species for aquaculture, new age fish feed with fortification for aquaculture sustainability, skilling of entrepreneurs, development of climate resilient fish variety, fish disease diagnostics and aqua-pharmaceuticals and therapeutics, aquaculture gadgets and precision aquaculture, sustainable fishing and farming in open waters, application of artificial intelligence and machine learning in aquaculture and farm management and post-harvest fish processing using modern techniques. In spite of this impressive growth, the above mentioned areas need to be addressed through horizontal and vertical expansion through technology infusion as well as climate change mitigation and adaptation, for sustainable development.


Session Schedule

Horizontal

Session ID

Name

University/Organisation

Country

Precision agriculture

V16H1S1

Title: Sensors and Sensing for Precision Agriculture

Date: 05 Oct 2020

Time: 1530 to 2200 hrs IST

Rabi N Sahoo

IARI, New Delhi

India

ChandrashekharBiradar

(ICARDA)-CGIAR

India

U B Desai

IIT-Hyderabad

India

C. Viswanathan

IARI, New Delhi

India

Dharmendra Saraswat

Purdue University

USA

Rajiv Khosla

Colorado State University

USA

PrasantMohapatra

University of California at Berkeley

USA

SoumikSarakar

Iowa State University

USA

SindhujaSankaran

Washington State University

USA

Lav R. Khot

Washington State University

USA

AlokSikka

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Anil Rai

ICAR-IASRI, New Delhi

India

Prameela Krishnan

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Vinay K Sehgal

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Gadi V.P. Reddy

USDA

USA

V16H1S2

Title: Automation in Farming System

Date: 06 Oct 2020

Time: 1730 IST to 2030 hrs IST

Manzul K. Hazarika

Asian Institute of Technology Bangkok

Thailand

Dharmendra Saraswat

Purdue University

USA

Ganesh Bora

USDA

USA

SreekalaBajwa

Montana State University

USA

Mehar S. Khatkar

University of Sydney

Australia

CR Mehta

ICAR-CIAE, Bhopal

India

Kanchan Kumar Singh

ICAR New Delhi

India

Gyanendra Kumar Gaur

ICAR-IVRI

India

Nabarun Bhattacharya

CDAC-Kolkata

India

V. K. Tewari

Director, IIT Kharagpur

India

Sandeep Kumar Garg 

IIT, Roorkee

India

Pitam Chandra

ICAR-CIAE, Bhopal

India

K Alagusundaram

ICAR New Delhi

India

Sameer Srivastava

IVRI

India

S K Singh

IIT, BHU

India

Ajay Sharda

Kansas State University

USA

V16H1S3

Title: ICT and Big-Data Analytics for Empowerment of Stakeholders

Date: 07 Oct 2020

Time: 1730 to 2130 hrs IST

Nitin K. Tripathi

Asian Institute of Technology Bangkok

Thailand

Narendra K Ahuja

University of Illinois

USA

SindhujaSankaran

Washington State University

USA

Manzul K. Hazarika

Asian Institute of Technology Bangkok

Thailand

Lav R. Khot

Washington State University

USA

SuchithAnand

University of Nottingham

UK

Prabir Kumar Biswas

IIT Kharagpur

India

J. Adinarayana

IIT Bombay

India

Mahua Bhattacharya

ABV Indian Institute of Information Technology & Management

India

DharmeshSaxena

SantLongowal Institute of Engineering and Technology (SLIET)

India

Rintu Banerjee

IIT Kharagpur

India

K N Tiwari

IIT Kharagpur

India

Dillip K Swain

IIT Kharagpur

India

 

Sustainable and Climate smart agriculture

V16H2S1

Title: Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and mitigation Technologies

Date: 8 Oct 2020

Time:1700 to 2100 hrs IST

Uday Nidumolu

CSIRO Agriculture and Food

Australia

Dev Niyogi

The University of Texas

USA

PV Vara Prasad

Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas

USA

Binayak P. Mohanty

Texas A&M University

USA

Brahma Singh

Padma Shri, DRDO

India

S. Naresh Kumar

IARI, New Delhi

India

DillipKr. Swain

IIT Kharagpur

India

B. Venkateswarlu

Ex VC, VN Marathwada Agricultural University

India

S. Bhaskar

ADG (Agronomy, Agro-forsetry and Climate Change), ICAR, New Delhi

India

HimanshuPathak

ICAR-National Institute of Abiotic Stress Management

India

Shiv Atri

IMD, New Delhi

India

M. Prabhakar

ICAR-CRIDA, HYderabad

India

N. Ravisankar

ICAR-IIFSR Modipuram

India

U C Mohanthy

IIT-Bhubaneswar

India

V16H2S2

Title:Resource conservation technologies

Date: 9 Oct 2020

Time: 1700 to 2100 hrs IST

Kaushik Majumdar

APNI

Morocco

J. K. Ladha

University of California

USA

Nanthi Bolan

The University of Newcastle, Australia

Australia

Muthu Bagavathiannan

Texas A&M University

USA

BS Dwivedi

IARI, New Delhi

India

J. C. Katyal

Former VC, CCSHAU

India

S. K. Chaudhari

Ex-DDG (NRM), ICAR

India

M. L. Jat

CIMMYT-India

India

Praveen Rao

PJTSAU, Hyderabad

India

V. K. Singh

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

AlokSikka

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

SrinivasaRao

ICAR-NAARM, Hyderabad

India

HimanshuPathak

ICAR-NIASM

India

AK Biswas

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Raj K Gupta

CIMMYT

India

RajbirYadava

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

OP Chaudhary

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

HS Sidhu

BISA, Ludhiana

India

AN Ganeshamurthy

CAU, Imphal

India

V16H2S3

Title: Microbial resource for sustainable agriculture 

Date: 10 Oct 2020

Time:1530 to 1930 hrs IST

Gupta Vadakattu

CSIRO

Australia

M. S. Reddy

Auburn University

USA

Brajesh Singh

Hawkesbury Institute for Environment, Western Sydney University

Australia

A. K. Singh

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Rashmi Aggarwal

Dean, ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

K. Annapurna

IARI, New Delhi

India

D.L.N. Rao

ICAR-Emeritus Scientist, Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal

India

Yogesh Schouche

NCCS, Pune

India

H B Singh

BHU, Varanasi

India

TK Adhya

ICAR-NRRI

India

AK Tripathi

BHU, Varanasi

India

Appa Rao Podile

University of Hyderabad

India

RC Kuhad

Central University of Haryana

India

Bushan L. Jalali 

HAU, Hissar

India

Lata

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

AK Saxena

ICAR-National Bureau of Agriculturally Important, Microorganisms

India

Jyotsana Sharma

ICAR-NRCP, Solapur

India

Bijay Kumar Behera

ICAR-Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute

India

Sanjay Barua

ICAR-NR on Equines, Hisar

India

U Sivakumar

Professor, TNAU, Tamilnadu

India

Srinivasan Ramasamy

World Vegetable Center, Shanhua, Tainan

Taiwan

B. Ramakrishnan

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Piyush Pandey

Assam University

India

Aundy Kumar

ICAR-IARI, New Delhi

India

Food safety and nutritional security

V16H3S1

Title: Primary Processing of agricultural produce

Date: 12 Oct 2020

Time: 2000 to 2300 hrs IST

Umesh Hebbar

CSIR-CFTRI

India

B. Manohar

CSIR-CFTRI

India

V.M. (Bala) Subramaniam

Ohio State University

USA

Mukund Karwe

Rutgers University

USA

Venkatesh Meda

University of Saskatchewan

Canada

Balunkeshwar Nayak

University of Maine

US

Hosahalli S. Ramaswamy

McGill University

Canada

Sangeeta  Prakash

University of Queensland

Australia

Venkatesh Balan

University of Houston

US

Ganti S. Murthy

IIT- Indore

India

Uday S. Annapure

Institute of Chemical Technology

India

Sandeep Mudaliar

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Subir Kumar Chakraborty

ICAR-CIAE

India

H. S. Oberoi

ICAR- IIHR

India

Manikantan M. R.

ICAR-CPCRI

India

Sukumar Debnath

CSIR-CFTRI

India

B.V. Satyendra Rao

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Pradyuman Kumar

SLIET, Sangrur

India

P. Srinivasa Rao

IIT, Kharagpur

India

V16H3S2

Title: Fortification and bio-molecules

Date: 13 Oct 2020

Time:1500 to 2000 hrs IST

Smita S. Lele

Institute of Chemical Technology

India

Sukhinder Cheema

Texas A and M University

US

Ramesh Kumar Saini

Konkuk University

Korea

Nitin

University of California

US

Edmond Rock

French National Institute of Agriculture, Food and Environment

France

Sarosh R. Bejai

Swedish University of Agricultural Science

Sweden

Harsh Bais

Delaware Biotechnology Institute

US

Kalidasa Shetty

North Dakota State University, Fargo

US

Bhimu Patil

Texas A and M university

US

Vikas Singh Chauhan

CSIR-CFTRI

India

H.N. Mishra

IIT, Kharagpur

India

Sirimavo Nair

M. S. University

India

C.K.Narayana

ICAR-IIHR

India

Kiran Bains

Punjab Agricultural University

India

Sareeta Srivastava

G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology

India

Rekha Singhal

Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai

India

O. P. Chauhan

DRDO-DFRL

India

Shylajav Ramlal

DRDO-DFRL

India

GiridharParvatam

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Shelly Praveen

ICAR-IARI

India

Sridevi Annapurna Singh

 CSIR-CFTRI

India

V16H3S3

Title: Food Safety and Quality

Date: 14 Oct 2020

Time: 2000 to 2300 hrs IST

Pranjib Chakraborty

ASRB, DARE, MoA & FW

India

M. R. Dinesh

ICAR-IIHR

India

Rahul Pawar

US Food and Drug Administration

India

Arun K Bhunia

Purdue University

US

Vijay K Juneja

US Department of Agriculture

US

Ashim Datta

Cornell University

US

M. R. Srinivas

Texas University

US

Solomon Darwin

Garwood Centre for Corporate Innovation

US

Amit Kumar Rai

Institute of Bioresources and Sustainable Development

US

F. A. Masoodi

University of Kashmir

India

A. K. Srivastava

CSIR-CFTRI

India

S. N. Jha

ICAR, New Delhi

India

Debi Sharma

ICAR-IIHR

India

Dr. Anu Appaiah

CSIR-CFTRI

India

N. Bhaskar

FSSAI

India

S. K. Panda

ICAR-CIFT

India

Sahayog Jamdar

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

India

Pradeep Singh Negi

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Shelly Praveen

ICAR-IARI

India

Ravi Kant Agrawal

ICAR- IVRI

India

Kaushik Banerjee

ICAR, New Delhi

India

S A Akbar

CSIR-CEERI

India

Kaushik Banerjee

ICAR-NRC-Grapes, Pune

India

V16H3S4

Title: Smart and Biodegradable Packaging

Date: 15 Oct 2020

Time: 2000 to 2300 hrs IST

H. N. Sharma

NIT, Agartala

India

R S Matche

CSIR-CFTRI

India

A. Ramaswamy

Penn State University

US

Amar K. Mohanty

University of Guelph

Canada

B. Nagaraj

Yeungnam University

Korea

R. Bhave

Oakridge National Laboratory

US

D.B. Bhattacharya

University of Kentucky

US

Kamlesh Sirkar

New Jersey Institute of Technology

US

Pramod Mahajan

Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bio-economy

US

R. Seeram

National University of Singapore

Singapore

Sandhiya Singh

National University of Singapore

Singapore

Brijesh K. Tiwari

TFRC, Ireland

Ireland

Shikha Ojha

Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB)

Germany

Sathish H. S.

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Deep Narayan Yadav

ICAR- CIPHET

India

V. Katiyar

Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati

India

U. Kharul

CSIR-NCL

India

Ravishankar C. N.

ICAR-CIFT

India

D. Chetana

CSIR-AMPRI

India

V16H3S5

Title: Storage and handling strategy

Date: 19 Oct 2020

Time:2000 to 2300 hrs IST

Virendra Kumar Tewari

IIT, Kharagpur

India

Keshavan Niranjan

University of Readings

UK

Shivani Pathania

TFRC

Ireland

Vivek. V Ranade

Quiens University Belfast

UK

John Lawrence

AGI Sure Track Marketing

US

Digvir S. Jayas

Uni. Of Manitoba Canada

Canada

R. K. Pal

Resident Advisor, YAU, Yenzin

Myanamar

 

B. V. C. Mahajan

Punjab Agriculture University

India

C. Anandaramakrishnan

IIFPT

India

N. M. Sachindra

CSIR-CFTRI

India

V. Kudachikar

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Eswara Reddy

CSIR-IIHBT

India

Jayadeep A.

CSIR-CFTRI

India

P. K. Nema

NIFTEM

India

Sandeep Mudaliar

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Alka Singh

ICAR-IARI

India

Vijayanand P.

CSIR-CFTRI

India

Anupama Singh

NIFTEM

India

Sudhakar Rao D V

ICAR-IIHR

India

S. D. Sakhare

CSIR-CFTRI

India

 

V16H4S1

Title: Application of genomic and phenomic tools for genetic improvement of indigenous AnGR and climate resilient animals

 

Date: 19 Oct 2020

Time: 1500 to 2100 hrs IST

Goutam Sahana

Aarhus University

Denmark

Arvind Gautam

Genus ABS India

United Kingdom

Kathiravan Periasamy

International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna

Austria

Pavneesh Madan

University of Guelph

Canada

Maulik Upadhyay

Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Veterinary Sciences, Germany

Germany

Lakshmi Kumar Matukumalli

USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

USA

Bhanu P. Telugu

University of Maryland

USA

K M Bujarbaruah

Fmr VC, AAU, Assam

India

Bhuvnesh Kumar

DRDO

India

BP Mishra

ICAR-IVRI

India

Manishi Mukesh

NBAGR (ICAR)

India

Prem Singh Yadav

CIRB (ICAR)

India

Manjit Panigrahi

Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI)

India

R.K.Vijh

NBAGR

India

Ravi Kumar Gandham

NIAB, Hyderabad

India

V16H4S2

Title: New generation veterinary therapeutics

Date: 20 Oct 2020

Time: 1500 to 2000 hrs IST

Vivek Kapur

Huck Institutes of Life Sciences

Tanzania

Siba K Samal

University of Maryland, Veterinary Medicine, College Park, College Park, USA

United States of America

Aniket Sanyal

Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI)

India

ML Madan

Ex-DDG (Animal Sciences), ICAR & Former VC, DUVASU, Mathura

India

G. Taru Sharma

Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI)

India

Naveen Kumar Navani

Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee

India

Vaithilingaraja Arumugaswami

UCLA Clinical and Translational Institute Connections

USA

Prem Kumar G

Pennsylvania State University

USA

S. Narasimha Murthy

The University of Mississippi

USA

Dinesh Kumar

ICAR-IVRI

India

S. Dey

ICAR-IVRI

India

Dr Amarpal

ICAR-IVRI

India

Eswari S

TNVASU

India

G Saikumar

ICAR-IVRI

India

Naveen Kumar

National Center for Veterinary Type Cultures

India

V16H4S3

Title: Immunobiological agents for animal disease management

Date: 21 Oct 2020

Time:1830 to 2200 hrs IST

Bikash Sahay

University of Florida

USA

Deepak Bhalchandra Salunke

Panjab University, Chandigarh

India

M P Yadav

Fmr Director, IVRI

India

V K Gupta

Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI)

India

Shetty Ravi Dyavar

University of Nebraska Medical Center

USA

Rohit K Jangra

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Jack and Pearl Resnick

USA

Aniket Sanyal

ICAR-IVRI

India

Amit Awasthi

Translational Health Science and Technology Institute

India

A K Tiwari

ICAR-IVRI

India

P K Gupta

ICAR-IVRI

India

Vivek Kapoor

Penn State University

USA

Alka Tomar

ICAR-IVRI

India

V16H4S4

Title: Zoonoses, One-Health and integrative approaches to tackle them

Date: 22 Oct 2020

Time:1730 to 2200 hrs IST

Trinad Chakraborty

Geissen University

Germany

Satya Parida

Pirbright Institute

United Kingdom

Bhushan Jayarao

Pennsylvania State University

USA

Baljit Singh

University of Calgary

Canada

Ramanan Laxminarayanan

Centre for Disease Dynamics Economics & Policy

USA

Navneet Dhand

University of Sydney

Australia

AK Srivastava

ASRB (ICAR), New Delhi

India

RK Singh

ICAR-IVRI, Izzatnagar

India

Dhinakar Raj

Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University

India

JPS Gill

Guru AngadDev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University

India

Subeer Majumdar

NIAB, Hyderabad

India

Shahid Jameel

Wellcome Trust DBT Indian Alliance

India

Praveen Malik

Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, Government of India

India

Sarman Singh

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal

India

GVS Murthy

Indian Institute of Public Health

India

SVS Malik

ICAR-IVRI

India

Nagendra R Hegde

NIAB, Hyderabad

India

Application of nanotechnology in agriculture and metabolic biology

V16H5S1

Title: Application of nanotechnology in agriculture and metabolic biology

Date:16 Oct 2020

Time:1630 to 2330 hrs IST

Kalidas Shetty

North Dakota State University

USA

Arun K. Bhunia

Purdue University

USA

Keshavan Niranjan 

University of Reading

Whiteknights

UK

Anubhav Pratap Singh

University of British Columbia

Canada

Seeram Ramakrishna

University of Singapore

Singapore

Rekha S. Singhal

Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai

India

Sunil Kumar Khare

IIT- Delhi

India

Rabibrata Mukherjee

IIT-Kharagpur

India

M. S. Thakur

CFTRI-Mysore

India

Vasudeva Singh

Guwahati University

India

K S Subramanian

TNAU

India

P.S.Vijayakumar

INST, Mohali

India

Modern fisheries, aquaculture and seed production

V16H6S1

Title: Modern fisheries, aquaculture and seed production

Date:16 Oct 2020

Time:1500 to 2030 hrs IST

Chadag Vishnumurthy Mohan

World Fish

Malaysia

Krishna R. Salin

Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Bangkok

Thailand

Ravi Fotedar

School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Curtin University

Australia

Ramakanta Nayak

Grobest Group Holding Limited

Hong Kong

Kiron Viswanath

Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture, Nord University

Norway

Rajeev Kumar Jha

Central Proteina Prima

Indonesia

Gopinath Nagraj

FanLi’s ecological laboratory

Malaysia

Rama Bangera

Benchmark Genetics

Norway

S.J. Kaushik

INRA

France

J.K. Jena

DDG (Fisheries), ICAR, New Delhi

India

B. K. Das

ICAR-CIFRI, Barrackpore

India

Dilip Kumar

ICAR-CIFE, Mumbai

India

P. Pravin

ADG (Fisheries), ICAR, New Delhi

India

Gopal Krishna

ICAR-CIFE, Mumbai

India

Iddya Karunasagar

KVAFSU, Mangalore & FAO

India

W.S. Lakra

ICAR, New Delhi

India

S.K. Swain

ICAR-CIFA, Bhubaneswar

India

P. Routray

ICAR-CIFA, Bhubaneswar

India