Vertical: V3 - Electronics and Semiconductor Technologies

Notice Board -

Indian researchers/scientists/academician/Ph.D. students may send an email at vaibhav.summit@iisc.ac.in to attend session(s) of V3-Electronics and Semiconductor Technologies vertical with session ID as provided in Session Schedule. You will get a link to attend the session on your email after approval.

   Horizontals

V3H1 : Semiconductor Materials and Process Technology

The modern high technology age was made possible by past and continuing developments in semiconductor materials and process technology, resulting in semiconductor devices like computer chips, displays, lighting sources, lasers, sensors and detectors, memory, batteries/supercapacitors, and photovoltaics. Though initial advances in semiconductor devices were made using Ge, once Si technology achieved maturity, supplemented by the invention of the planar process, and synergized with development of integrated circuits for various applications, Si became the workhorse material for devices. Owing to physical limitations imposed by Si’s indirect bandgap, III-V materials such as GaAs, InSb, their various alloys, helped launch the optoelectronic revolution. Other compound semiconductors such as III-N found applications in blue LEDs and lasers, power devices and radiation hard detectors. The increased interest in SiC, along with its numerous polytypes, made it possible to design power devices with even higher blocking voltages than for Si LDMOS, or with higher power levels than for GaN.

Newer materials such as materials at lower dimensionality, such as carbon nanodots, nanowires, quantum wells, two-dimensional materials, gallium oxide, organic and polymeric materials (including biocompatible materials), oxide semiconductors, perovskites and other organic-inorganic hybrid materials, have attracted significant research interest among practitioners in electrical engineering, materials science, chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, medicine and biology, mechanical engineering, computer science, as the implications of growth in these next generation technologies and changed design paradigms including unconventional integration and packaging methods.

At the sub-5nm CMOS and beyond Si CMOS front, the aggressive downsizing of CMOS devices in past few decades has shown remarkable growth in device performance. Integrating devices with feature size as low as 5nm requires novel architectures, high performance materials and state-of- the-art manufacturing techniques. New architectures such as FinFET transistors, gate all around (GAA) transistors and increased number of interconnect layers significantly increase the integration complexity. Patterning devices at nanoscale requires unprecedented precision of light sources used for lithography. Extreme UV (EUV) sources are being employed to resolve the fine patterns. The ultra-scaling of devices also mandates shrinking of gate oxide. The gate dielectrics thickness has reduced to few atomic layers thickness. Less than 1nm oxide thickness leads to gate leakage and hence increase the power consumption. It calls for use of novel high-k dielectrics such as Hafnium or Zirconium based oxides. The deposition processes also need precise control and uniformity for large scale integration. In addition to Silicon, 2D materials such as graphene, MoS2 have shown tremendous potential to enable further device scaling without compromising on the performance. However, there is still a major roadblock to obtain a uniform material growth necessary for commercial production

 Design concepts, packaging architectures, type of devices, materials and their manufacturing processes and systems integration technologies are changing rapidly. These innovations have resulted in development of several new technologies as well as extension of technologies introduced in prior years. Heterogeneous integration with wireless and mixed signal devices, bio-devices, power devices, optoelectronics, and MEMS in a single package is creating a requirement for the industry. These diverse components are the elements for System-in-Package (SiP) architectures.

 These technologies, capabilities, and capacities in chip as well as packaging materials and process technologies form the core of the high technology industry. Thus, it is rightly considered the crown jewel of a country’s industry since it enables the nation’s strategic independence as well as provides a force multiplier role for all the other industries.


V3H2 : Electronic Devices: Physics and Technology 
1. Nanoscale Devices Beyond Si and Memory Devices

A standard compute system or a chip consists of switching devices (FETs) and memory devices. Industry currently is working on 5nm FinFET or Nanoribbon FET devices. Given Si can’t be scaled below, materials like 2D/1D (low dimensional materials) offer promise for further scalability. These are the materials that are atomically thin in one or two dimensions, also called as 1D or 2D materials. Graphene, a carbon-based material, which is one atom thick, is the best example of a 2D material. Other 2D materials (there are around 700) are Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (TMDCs) and Phosphorene, to name a few. Memory, on the other hand is used for storing data, which are retrieved, processed, and encoded back to the memory unit to execute all computational tasks. Since the overall computational efficiency is limited by the von Neumann bottleneck caused by memory latency, it is imperative that the memory technologies advance too. Next generation memories with high switching speed, high endurance and good retention as compared to present memories have potential to replace the existing SRAMs, DRAMs, and other memories. Besides, novel emerging memory technologies, have also created avenues to smarter and intelligent computing, ex. bio-inspired neuromorphic computing.


2. Power Devices:

Power semiconductor devices, made of Si, SiC or GaN, have enabled production of energy efficient and compact power electronics. With increasing demand for green and renewable energy systems, efficient power semiconductor devices are the need of the hour. Power devices have established themselves in several high value applications across different market segments including automotive, aerospace, information technology, power converters, power supplies, and grid infrastructure. With silicon being the material of choice for its wide availability and mature technology, several advancements have been implemented to make silicon technology more efficient and compact. On the other hand, several other material options in the regime of wide bandgap semiconductors are being explored for increasing efficiency of power semiconductor devices.


3. Sensing Devices:

Nanosensors are devices that measure physical quantities and process the signals in a detectable and comparable format. Over the years, sensing has been used to detect gases, biological molecules, physical quantities like stress, electrical signals, and optical signals, with each of these fields attracting humungous attention due to their promise. Sensors play a pivotal role in medicine, defence, environmental studies and everyday electronics like mobiles etc. The recent advances of sensor technologies have been powered by high-speed and low-cost electronic circuits, novel signal processing methods and innovative advances in manufacturing technologies. Developments in these fields allow completely novel approaches increasing the performance of technical products. The rapid progress of sensor manufacturing technologies, sensor architecture and material-based research allows the production of systems and components with a low cost-to-performance ratio. A successful development of sensor technology provides ROI to academia in form of enhanced research capabilities and intellectual properties and to industry, in form of marketable products.


4. Test and Reliability:

The deployment of novel semiconductor devices, circuits and systems in the industry requires an understanding of how reliable they are. Reliability of semiconductor devices deal with the estimation of number/length of time a semiconductor device/circuit/system can be exposed to certain environment/event without causing any degradation in the performance of the device. With downscaling of semiconductor devices, the sensitivity of devices on stress events increases exponentially. It is necessary to understand various failure mechanisms involved and engineer the device architecture/design accordingly to improve the overall reliability of devices. This calls for detailed reliability analysis and development of testing procedures which form an essential part of the design workflow assisting the device designers to: (i) identify potential sources of failure, (ii) estimate the likelihood of a particular failure (failure rate and time to failure), (iii) understand the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for such failures along with identification of external factors which influences the process, and, (iv) design novel solutions towards preventing failure, or at least minimize the impact of failure. To enable reliability-aware device and system design, novel characterization and testing protocols are necessary which can subject the devices to conditions encountered in real-life operating conditions.


V3H3 : Electronic Circuits and System Design

Electronic circuits and systems are pervasive in our daily life such as mobile phones, cars, consumer electronics etc. Electronic systems cover all the way from low power IoT to high performance processor to board level systems. Depending on the application, a variety of circuits and systems are designed and used considering different constraints. Circuit types can be broadly divided in three categories – analog, digital and RF circuits. Large number of academicians are working in all these areas. Nowadays the boundary between different circuits has faded and variety of new circuits and architecture are overlapping in these areas. Chip-package co-design is also becoming extremely important with advancement in technology.

1. Compact modelling: The circuit design can only be as good as the underlying compact models that capture all the intricacies of underlying semiconductor device and materials technologies. With shrinking feature size of devices, new phenomena need to modelled accurately. A few examples include modelling of new quantum mechanical effects, device parasitics at high frequencies etc.

2. Analog Circuits: With downscaling of supply voltages, the design of analog circuits poses new challenges due to reduced head room and signal swings. The new design concepts such as digitally tunable analog circuits become very interesting proposition. There are variety of new emerging analog circuits especially for Non-Von Neuman architecture and approximate computing. Since the digital technology tends to be at leading edge, designing analog circuits despite the limitations of digital technology to enable mixed signal circuits becomes very challenging area for exploration.

3. Digital circuits: More than 90% components in any consumer electronic system are made up of digital circuits. Digital circuits have always been designed using cutting edge technology to take the benefit the trade- off between high performance and low power offered by advanced technology node devices. Given the investment required in the advanced technology nodes, very few foundries are left which are working in 5nm node and beyond. Bulk MOS transistors have been the driving force behind digital ICs for several decades. In the last decade, two new structures – FinFET and FDSOI have emerged as the replacement to address the issues faced with bulk MOSFETs. Although FDSOI transistors have benefit of using existing planar process technology, FinFET is best suited for high performance digital applications.

4. RF, mm wave Terra Hertz circuits: Conventional MMICs working at RF and mm-wave frequency ranges and board level RF circuits need sophisticated and dedicated fabrication and characterization facilities to accurately fabricate and measure the performance at high frequencies. Additionally, the exponential rise of date rates in wireless communication systems has been predicted to continue well into this decade and the next. This will necessitate design development and characterization of circuits spanning the entire range of 2-400GHz spectrum in the near future. Since the sub-THz spectrum can offer ten times more bandwidth than the mm-wave spectrum, the wireless community will naturally look for solutions in these frequency ranges. Many research groups and R&D labs across the globe have started to explore these opportunities in earnest. Owing to demand for high data rate communication, research and deployment of fifth generation (5G) wireless communication protocol is in full swing. Upcoming 5th generation of cellular communication (and 6G in future) is being positioned as a revolutionary technology for mobile communication, IoT, and automotive applications. Several high frequency bands between 24 GHz to 72 GHz have been allocated for the purpose, with the aim of providing larger signal bandwidth to the consumers. High frequency carriers allow wider signal bands around them, thereby ensuring larger data rates.


Session Schedule

Horizontal

Session ID

Name

University/Organisation

Country

Semiconductor Materials and Process Technologies

V3H1S1
Title: Growth/synthesis of next generation materials
Date: 05/10/2020
Time 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Kunal Mukherjee

Stanford University

USA

Manish Chhowalla

Cambridge University

UK

Prashant Kamat

University of Notre Dame

USA

Siddharth Rajan

The Ohio State University

USA

Sushobhan Avasthi

IISc, Bangalore

India

Praveen Ramamurthy

IISc, Bangalore

India

Anirban Bhattachrya

University of Calcutta

India

Arnab Bhattachrya

TIFR

India

Dinesh K Pandya

IIT Jammu

India

Harish Barshilla

NAL

India

Krishna Bharadwaj Balasubramanian

IIT kanpur

India

Rajendra Singh

IIT Delhi

India

Shaibal Mukherjee

IIT Indore

India

Shouvik Chatterjee

TIFR

India

Srinivasan Raghavan

IISc, Bangalore

India

V3H1S2
Title: Process challenges in advanced nodes and next generation materials
Date: 06/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Anupam Madhukar

University of Southern California

USA

Bharat Jalan

University of Minnesota

USA

Kameshwar Poolla

University of California, Berkeley

USA

Kaustav Banerjee

University of California, Santa Barbara

USA

Kedar Hippalgaonkar

National Technological University

Singapore

Durga Misra

New Jersey Institute of Technology

USA

R. Ramesh

Bekeley

USA

Dileep Nair

IIT M

India

Mayank Shrivastava

IISc, Bangalore

India

Navakanta Bhat

IISc, Bangalore

India

Nihar Mohapatra

IIT GandhiNagar

India

Nirat Ray

IIT Delhi

India

Shankar Selvaraja

IISc, Bangalore

India

Sourabh Lodha

IISc, Bangalore

India

Ramgopal Rao

India

V3H1S3
Title: Manufacturing eco-system for conventional semiconductor-based process technologies
Date: 07/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Sanjay Krishna

The Ohio State University

USA

Dileep Nair

IIT M

India

Mayank Shrivastava

IISc, Bangalore

India

Navakanta Bhat

IISc, Bangalore

India

Nihar Mohapatra

IIT GandhiNagar

India

Rudra Pratap

IISc, Bangalore

India

Srinivasan Raghavan

IISc, Bangalore

India

Swaroop Ganguly

IIT-B

India

Dr. Surinder Singh

SCL

India

Juzer Vasi

IIT B

India

Ramgopal Rao

India

Shri Saurabh Gaur

Meity

India

V3H1S4
Title: Flexible, printable, wearable electronics, and additive manufacturing
Date: 08/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Ravinder Dahiya

University of Glassgow

UK

Subodh G. Mhaisalkar

National Technological University

Singapore

Bhola Nath Pal

IIT-BHU

India

Brijesh Kumar

IIT Roorkee

India

Madhusudan Singh

IITD

India

Parasuraman Swaminathan

IITM

India

S Sundar K Iyer

IITK

India

Sanjiv Sambandan

IISc

India

Shree Prakash Tiwari

IITJ

India

Yashowanta N. Mohapatra

IIT Kanpur

India

V3H1S5
Title: Heterogeneous integration and packaging
Date: 09/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Abhijit Chatterjee

Georgia Institute of Technology

USA

Puneet Gupta

University of California at LA

USA

Rao Tummala

Georgia Institute of Technology

USA

Subramanian S. Iyer

UCLA

USA

Yogesh B. Gianchandani

Michigan Engineering

USA

Achu Chandran

CSIR-NIIST, Thiruvananthapuram

India

Dr. P.K. Khanna

CSIR-CEERI, Pilani

India

Nikhil Suri

CEERI

India

Pradeep Dixit

IIT, Bombay

India

Rudra Pratap

IISc, Bangalore

India

Samaresh Das

IIT Delhi

India

Shiv Govind Singh

IIT Hyderabad

India

Semiconductor Devices: Physics
and Technology

V3H2S1
Title: Sensing Devices
Date: 12/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Aaswath Raman

UCLA

USA

Ashwin A Seshia

Cambridge University

UK

Parag B. Deotare

University of Michigen

USA

Sandip Tiwari

Cornell

USA

Thundat Thomas

SUNY Buffalo

USA

Durgamadhab Misra

NJIT

USA

Subhas Mukhopadhyay

Macquarie University

Australia

Muthukumaran Packirisamy

Concordia University

Canada

Veena Misra

NCSU

USA

Ravinder Dahiya

University of Glasgow

UK

Zubin Jacob

Purdue University

USA

Deleep R Nair

IIT M

India

Dhiman mallick

IIT D

India

Madhusudan Singh

IIT D

India

Mahesh Kumar

IIT Jodhpur

India

Rajiv Prakash

IIT-BHU

India

Saurabh Chandorkar

IISc, Bangalore

India

Roy P. Paily

IIT Guwahati

India

Shiv Govind Singh

IIT Hyderabad

India

V. Seena

IIST Thiruvananthapuram

India

Saurabh Kumar Pandey

IIT Patna

India

Shaibal Mukherjee

IIT Indore

India

Tapajyoti Das Gupta

IISc, Bangalore

India

Rudra Pratap

IISc, Bangalore

India

V3H2S2
Title: Power Devices and Reliability Physics
Date: 13-10-2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Bharat Jalan

University of Minnesota

USA

K Radhakrishnan

National Technological University

Singapore

Srabanti Chowdhury

Stanford University

USA

Anjan Chakravorthy

IIT M

India

Ankush Bag

IIT Mandi

India

Biplab Sarkar

IIT Roorkee

India

Mayank Shrivastava

IISc, Bangalore

India

Nihar Mohapatra

IIT Gandhi nagar

India

V3H2S3
Title: Nanoscale transistors and memory devices
Date: 15/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Abu Sebastian

IBM

Switzerland

Aditya Mohite

Rice University

USA

Amit Ranjan Trivedi

University of Illinois Chicago

USA

Aravind Vijayaraghavan

University of Manchester

UK

Subhasish Chakraborty

University of Manchester

UK

Gururaj Naik

Rice University

USA

Kaustav Banerjee

University of California, Santa Barbara

USA

Radha Boya

University of Manchester

UK

Ravindra N. Bhatt

Princeton University

USA

Saptarshi Das

Penn State

USA

Bhaswar Chakrabarti

IIT Madras

India

Abhinav Kranti

IIT Indore

India

Arnab Datta

IIT Roorkee

India

Kausik Majumdar

IISc

India

Manan Suri

IIT D

India

Mayank Shrivastava

IISc

India

Navakanta Bhat

IISc

India

Sanjeev Manhas

IIT Roorkee

India

Shaibal Mukherjee

IIT Indore

India

Electronic Circuits
and
System Design

V3H3S1
Title: Device Characterization and Compact Modelling
Date: 19/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Durga Misra

New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT)

USA

Puneet Gupta

UCLA

USA

Sanjay Banerjee

The University of Texas

USA

Anjan Chakravorthy

IIT Madras

India

Dr. Meena Mishra

SSPL

India

Harshit Agarwal

IIT Jodhpur

India

Santosh Vishvakarma

IIT Indore

India

Yogesh Singh Chauhan

IIT Kanpur

India

V3H3S2
Title: Full custom design
Date: 20/10/2020
Time: 8:30pm - 10:30pm

Arindam Basu

National Technological University

Singapore

Abhijit Chatterjee

Georgia Institute of Technology

USA

Bipin Rajendran

King's College London

UK

Kaushik Sengupta

Princeton University

USA

Keshab Parhi

University of Minnesota

USA

Sudhakar Pamarti

UCLA

USA

Siddhartha Joshi

University of Notre Dame

USA

Amit Acharyya

IITH

India

Ankesh Jain

IITD

India

Gaurab Banerjee

IISc

India

Virendra Singh

IIT B

India

Imon Mondal

IITK

India

joyce Meckie

IITGn

India

Rajesh C Panicker

NUS

India

Shanthi Pavan

IITM

India

Rajesh H. Zele

IITB

India

V3H3S3
Title: Digital system & Processor design
Date: 21/10/2020
Time: 0830-1030PM

Vijay Janapa Reddi

Harvard University

USA

Subhashish Mitra

Stanford University

USA

Kapil Jainwal

IIT Bhilai

IIT Bhilai

V3H3S4
Title: Board level integration
Date: 22/10/2020
Time: 0830-1030PM

Ranjan Singh

National Technological University

Singapore

Shreyas Sen

Purdue University

USA

Ram Achar

Carleton

Canada

Rao Tummala

GATECH

USA

Abhishek Kumar

IITH

India

Jaleel Akhtar

IIT Kanpur

India

Nagarjuna Nallam

IITGu

India

Shalabh Gupta

IITB

India

Shri Vinod Sharma

Deki Electronics Ltd

India