Vertical: V7 - Photonics

Notice Board -

Indian researchers/scientists/academician/Ph.D. students may send an email at vaibhav_photonics@iiserb.ac.into attend session(s) of V7-Photonics vertical with session ID as provided in Session Schedule. You will get a link to attend the session on your email after approval.

   Horizontals

V7H1 : Nonlinear Optics, Meta-Optics and Quantum Photonics

This Horizontal comprises a broad subfield of photonics where the light-matter interaction is engineered to achieve novel optical phenomena beyond what we usually experience in everyday life.

A classic example of such novel behavior is nonlinear optics where high-intensity light is used to achieve tunable light sources using phenomena such as second harmonic and sum- and difference-frequency generation. These light sources can be used in applications that need intense sources of light at wavelengths for which laser sources are not available. A particularly useful application, which is related to horizontal II, is in microscopy to improve resolution of images. Novel material designs are being pursued to obtain nonlinear optical phenomena at lower intensities for a wider range of applications.

Optical frequency combs have been developed in the past two decades and have been transformative to research in the field of metrology. Frequency combs combined with cold-atom physics has resulted in atomic clocks, which provide the most accurate measurement of time. Beyond metrology, these atomic clocks have been leveraged to study minute changes in gravity on the surface of the earth and are also critical for timekeeping. Proposed applications of frequency combs include measurement of gravitational waves through space-based interferometer and measurement of permanent dipole moment of an electron.

Meta-optics incorporates meta-materials, meta-surfaces and meta-devices and is used to engineer a desired optical response. These devices utilize materials with periodic structures with periodicity lower than the wavelength of light it is designed for. They have possible applications in cloaking, ghost imaging and time crystals which can have great societal impact.

Quantum optics is beyond the classical realm and provides a fascinating set of optical properties with diverse applications. The blooming field of quantum information science, which includes quantum computing and quantum communication, is a prime example of the transformative role quantum technologies can play in our life. Quantum photonic materials which act as single photon sources have been utilized for quantum bits (qubits). Squeezed states of light are used for increasing sensitivity of detectors beyond the classical limit; this phenomenon has been used to improve the sensitivity of LIGO. Light of the same wavelength but with different orbital angular momenta is also being explored from the perspective of massively-multiplexed communication networks.


V7H2 : Optical Imaging and Biophotonics

Optical Imaging and Biophotonics: Optical imaging uses light to monitor and interrogate various processes ranging from microscale to macroscale. It has application in understanding molecular processes at cellular level in the human body as well as acquiring intricate details about the atmosphere and oceans. Light in the wavelength ranging from ultraviolet to near infrared is used to interrogate cellular and molecular function in the living body, as well as in animal and plant tissue. Diagnosis and prognosis can be explained using spectral markers of biochemical components in body fluids/tissues etc. of various diseases. Biophotonics is an emerging area of research encompassing all light-based technologies applicable to the life sciences and medicine. Similarly, atmospheric and ocean imaging uses light across the electromagnetic spectrum to create images of the atmosphere and the oceans to visualize their properties and behavior. A few examples are listed below to provide a brief description about the key areas that require substantial attention and efforts to make India self-reliant in the application of optical imaging and biophotonics in the field of medical and atmospheric sciences.

Medical Imaging: Medical imaging refers to application of optical imaging in creating the images of various parts of the human body for diagnostic and treatment purposes. Therefore, it plays a vital role in initiatives to improve public health for everyone. Medical imaging covers essential aspects of medical science such as diagnosis, prognosis, tissue imaging, multi-modal imaging, multiplex imaging, and organ or full body imaging.

Noninvasive and in-vivo: Noninvasive and in-vivo imaging is the application of optical imaging in creating images of objects in their native environments, without interfering with their functions. This allows us to monitor and interrogate the real-life processes/events in real time. Noninvasive and in-vivo imaging includes beyond-the-wall imaging, endoscopy, bio-markers, cellular imaging, disease recognition, tumor identification.

Atmospheric and Ocean: Various imaging techniques are making use of light to understand the properties of the atmosphere as well as the oceans, to study their irregularities and to predict the future events. These techniques include Doppler and LIDAR to monitor climate change and to discover natural resources.

Medical Intervention: Medical interventions such as image-guided surgery are performed by applying optical imaging for real-time visualization of the organ/tumor under operation. Medical interventions encompass laser surgery, optical stimulation, neurophotonics, and optogenetics.

Nanoscopy: In conventional approach, microscopes are unable to visualize objects smaller than a couple of hundreds nanometers. This necessitates the application of optical imaging and biophotonic techniques with better resolution to be able to understand processes in live cells and tissues down to few nanometer spatial resolution. Nanoscopy promises to unravel underlying mechanisms at the atomic to molecular level through super-resolution imaging.


V7H3 : Photonic Materials and Devices

Photonic materials and devices are used to create, detect and/or manipulate light for diverse applications based on the material technologies such as magneto-optic data storage, wide band-gap semiconductors, semiconductor laser materials, color imaging and chemical sensors etc. These devices encompass everyday items such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and displays to extremely sensitive sensors and detectors. They play a significant role in technological progress in society. On the one hand, a common device such as affordable and efficient, solar-powered LED can enable students without permanent electricity to get education and lead them to improved quality of life. On the other hand, photonic devices also form the backbone of state-of-the-art applications such as global-positioning systems, space exploration and military. 

Materials engineered with a periodic arrangement of low and high dielectric regions in 1D, 2D and 3D structures show a strong impact on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation. As a consequence, they exhibit photonic band gaps that enable certain wavelengths or band of wavelengths are forbidden to propagate through these materials. The photonic band gaps can be tuned by tailoring the pattern of the low and high dielectric regions. Materials as detectors and sensors for light ranging from deep ultraviolet to terahertz frequency range including infrared need to be developed to bring their performances at par with existing technologies for visible light. In particular, devices for fast and accurate detection of ultra fast pulses could lead to multiplexed measurements of optical properties. 

Furthermore, improvements in the sensitivity of these sensors will enable real-world applications of technologies such as single-photon devices, which have so far been restricted to controlled laboratory environments. Advancements in such areas can be extended to develop products for applications such as portable spectrometers, chemical detection for security, monitoring real-time air quality, environment-friendly displays, light sources and LiDAR for self-driving automobiles.


V7H4: Micro & Nanophotonics

A nanoscale confinement of electromagnetic field as a consequence of coupling of light with electrons at the metal interfaces, has been extensively adapted in spectroscopy and nonlinear effects. Such a confinement of the electromagnetic fields leads to counterintuitive properties such as achieving sub-diffraction limit resolution. Several applications involving plasmonics have emerged such as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that enables non-destructive, label-free analysis of chemical entities at nanometer scale. Plasmonics show promising applications such as photocatalytic activity in water-splitting process and detection of single molecule fluorescence/spectroscopy. Near-field scanning optical microscopy is another method where optical resolution of ~50 nm can be achieved. 

This phenomenon has been extended for label-free biosensing of biomolecules with the concentration of femto molar using micro fluidic channels possessing nanophotonic cavity. Lithographic techniques are typically employed for developing plasmonic devices, such methods become expensive while dealing with the scalability of the samples. Alternative and cost-effective methods to be developed in order to achieve the full advantage of plasmonic devices. Nano electromechanical system (NEMS), a miniaturized form of MEMS that rely on integrating the electronics with the physical motion of nanometer-scale structures have wide application range from mechanical actuators and sensors, to micro-optical systems, and chemical sensors. Development of NEMS/MEMS based meta-surfaces/materials would extend the scope of applications such as ultra-fast and low-power switches, high-frequency resonators, and mass detectors.


V7H5: Integrated Photonics and Communication

It has been seen during the lockdown that online education has exceedingly increased the audio/video traffic on the internet networks. This has immensely escalated the demand of communication systems for the internet. Cloud storage data center, ultra-broadband video services, and 6G mobile network services have stimulated the development of optical transport network technology. Optical components need to be developed for accommodating increasing demand of highly efficient transmission and processing. Photonics integrated circuits promise to meet this increasing demand of communication systems for the internet. Following are a few areas that will be benefitted by advanced Integrated Photonics and communication technologies to make the country self-reliant in optical communication. 

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) uses optical light to illuminate the target and measure reflections to create a three-dimensional representation of the target. The targets can be from atmosphere, space, and everyday life. Advances in Integrated Photonics and communication systems promise to acquire substantially better resolution data in significantly less amount of time and have the potential to provide intricate details about atmosphere, space, and improve security.

Optical communication uses light to carry the information, faster than anything else, from one place to another. The future holds the challenges associated with efficient transfer of heavy loads of information. Therefore, optical communication requires some visionary developments to address the upcoming challenges. Advanced technologies need to be developed to be able to handle transmission of ultra-high-density audio and video, provide ultra-high-speed internet, utilize the potential of quantum optics, to apply novel photonic processes, RAPID, and achieve high throughput. 

As the amount of data generated across different sectors is rapidly growing, there is a surge in the demand of better transmission components. Optical components and media provide substantial advantages for data transmission over their electronic counterparts. Photonic integrated circuits are devices housing many integrated optical components, they provide functions for information signals imposed on optical wavelengths.


Session Schedule

Horizontal

Session ID

Name

University/Organisation

Country

V7H1

Nonlinear Optics, Meta-Optics and Quantum Photonics

V7H1S1

Title: Nonlinear Optics, Meta-Optics and Quantum Photonics


Date: 13.10.2020


Time: 6:00-9:00 PM (IST)

Prof. Siddharth Ramachandran  (Chair)

Boston University

United States of America

Prof. Samit Kumar Ray  (Co-Chair)

S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences

India

Dr. Amit Agarwal

NIST, Gaithesburg

United States of America

Prof. Vinod Menon

The City College of New York

United States of America

Prof. Srinivasan Anand

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Sweden

Dr. Akshay Rao

University of Cambridge

United Kingdom

Dr. Purnima Malhotra

LASTEC Delhi

India

Prof. Dibakar Roy Chowdhury

Mahindra University, Hyderabad

India

Prof. Urbasi Sinha

RRI

India

Prof. Kamal Priya Singh

IISER Mohali

India

Prof. S. Anantha Ramakrishna

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

Dr. Manoj Kumar Bhuyan

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

Dr. Rohan Singh  (Session Coordinator)

IISER Bhopal

India

V7H2

Optical Imaging and Biophotonics

V7H2S1

Title: Optical Imaging and Biophotonics


Date: 09.10.2020


Time: 6:00-9:00 PM (IST)

Prof. Rohit Bhargava  (Chair)

Cancer Center at Illinois

United States of America

Prof. Arindam Chowdhury  (Co-Chair)

IIT Bombay

India

Prof. Sumeet Mahajan

University of Southampton

United Kingdom

Prof. Anita Mahadevan-Jansen

Vanderbilt University

United States of America

Prof. Prabhat Verma

Osaka University

Japan

Prof. Ishan Barman

Johns Hopkins Univ

United States of America

Prof. Sukhdev Roy

Dayalbagh Educational Institute

India

Prof. Sobhan Sen

Jawaharlal Nehru University

India

Dr. Suchandan Pal

CEERI Pilani

India

Prof. Saptarshi Mukherjee  (Session Coordiantor)

IISER Bhopal

India

Dr. Sanjeev Soni

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

V7H3

Photonic Materials and Devices

V7H3S1

Title: Photonic Materials and Devices


Date: 12.10.2020 & 13.10.2020


Time: 4:30-6:00 PM (IST)

Prof. Chennupati Jagadish  (Chair)

Australian National University

Australia

Prof. Nikhil Ranjan Das  (Co-Chair)

University of Calcutta

India

Prof. Sanjay Krishna

The Ohio State University

United States of America

Prof. Durgambadhab (Durga) Misra

New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT)

United States of America

Prof. Rajeev Ram

MIT

United States of America

Prof. Sebastian Lourdudoss

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Sweden

Prof. Ritesh Agarwal

University of Pennsylvania

United States of America

Prof. Subhananda Chakrabarti

IIT Bombay

India

Prof. Anil Prabhakar

IIT Madras

India

Prof. Tarun Sharma

RRCAT Indore

India

Dr. Ravindra Pal

SSPL Delhi

India

Dr. Pushpasree Mishra

SSPL Delhi

India

Prof. T. Srinivas

IISc Bengaluru

India

Dr. Amit Lochan Sharma

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

Dr. Y. Adithya Lakshmanna  (Session Coordinator)

IISER Bhopal

India

Prof. Arindam Ghosh

Indian Institute of Science Bengaluru

India

V7H4

Micro & Nanophotonics

V7H4S1

Title: Micro & Nanophotonics


Date: 15.10.2020


Time: 7:30-11:00 AM (IST)

Prof. Ranjan Singh  (Chair)

Nanyang Technological University

Singapore

Prof. Shriganesh Prabhu  (Co-Chair)

TIFR Mumbai

India

Dr. Rohit Prasankumar

Los Alamos National Laboratory

United States of America

Prof. Kaushik Sengupta

Princeton University

United States of America

Prof. Keshav M. Dani

Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Japan

Prof. Sukhdeep Dhillon

Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris

France

Prof. Srinivasan Anand

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Sweden

Prof. Zubin Jacob

Purdue University

United States of America

Prof. Anuj Dhawan

IIT Delhi

India

Prof. Rajan Jha

IIT Bhubaneswar

India

Prof. Venu Gopal Achanta

TIFR

India

Prof. Nirmalya Ghosh

IISER Kolkata

India

Dr. Sudha Gupta

SSPL Delhi

India

Dr. Sudipto Sarkar Pal

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

Dr. Sachin Dev Verma  (Session Coordinator)

IISER Bhopal

India

V7H5

Integrated Photonics and Communication

V7H5S1

Title: Integrated Photonics and Communication


Date: 20.10.2020


Time: 7:00-10:00 PM (IST)

Prof. Shayan Mookherjea  (Chair)

University of California San Diego

United States of America

Prof. Bijoy Krishna Das (Co-Chair)

Indian Institute of Technology Madras

India

Prof. Saikat Guha

University of Arizona

United States of America

Prof. Ajay Joshi

Boston University

United States of America

Dr. Naresh Chand

IEEE Photonics

United States of America

Prof. Jayanta Sahu

University of Southampton

United Kingdom

Dr. Som Kumar Sharma

Physical Research Laboratory

India

Dr. A K Razdan

LASTEC, Delhi

India

Dr. Amol Chaudhary

IIT Delhi

India

Prof. S.K. Selvaraja

IISc, Bengaluru

India

Prof. Deepa Venkitesh

IIT Madras

India

Sh. Kamal Lohani

SSPL Delhi

India

Dr. Samir K Mondal  (Session Coordinator)

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

Dr. Umesh Kumar Tiwari

CSIR-CSIO Chandigarh

India

Prof. Shalabh Gupta

IIT Bombay

India